Book 5 - Prologue 30

Can my codename be Brown Sugar?

Book 5 - Prologue 30
Comic - Book 5 - Page 30

Recent posts... (See full thread)
greycat wrote:
Skull the Troll wrote:
I'm also starting to think that if Noah and Sugar end up on the same page that will truly be a force.

And... if Noah and Sugar end up on the same Paige, that'll be extra kinky even by Erfworld standards. :hamstard:


That was awful, have a tip just for the brain bleach i need.
Quote:
And second the MK has a huge massive enormous neutrality system that would certainly make that illegal, and lastly there's so many sides spread out over such a huge area that most, (probably only Charlie), sides probably aren't even aware there is a side out there that no one else knows the location of.


That seems like the sort of project Parson would like to create, if he had the time and access to the Magic Kingdom. Map out all the portals in the MK, try to gather information on each one of the sides with a portal (such as enemies and ruler), use the enemies list to create an approximate world map. If he had a lot of time, he could open a dialogue with as many sides as possible, doing map exchanges and library book exchanges. If he studied the books well enough, he could potentially figure out where a bunch of the extinct capital sites of the world are, which could come in handy if tutelaries have big drawbacks. Doing all of this would lead to him "discovering" all the bubble sides.
Delores Mulva wrote:
Quote:
And second the MK has a huge massive enormous neutrality system that would certainly make that illegal, and lastly there's so many sides spread out over such a huge area that most, (probably only Charlie), sides probably aren't even aware there is a side out there that no one else knows the location of.


That seems like the sort of project Parson would like to create, if he had the time and access to the Magic Kingdom. Map out all the portals in the MK, try to gather information on each one of the sides with a portal (such as enemies and ruler), use the enemies list to create an approximate world map. If he had a lot of time, he could open a dialogue with as many sides as possible, doing map exchanges and library book exchanges. If he studied the books well enough, he could potentially figure out where a bunch of the extinct capital sites of the world are, which could come in handy if tutelaries have big drawbacks. Doing all of this would lead to him "discovering" all the bubble sides.


Next become first host of the (Erf)World Congress. Then watch as Charlie proposes bans on luxes like Faygo and magnets. And has the delegates to back it up.
Titan wrote:
New One is up. Trying our hand at a comic page.
When Rob predicted that erfworld might not update for the whole year, I was disappointed. I ignored the offered refund; I had paid in good faith. But, I decided that if y'all didn't update for three months, I would end my subscription. Luckily, y'all were able to publish text updates starting the end of June. That allayed my fear. And now, here's a comic.

Congrats. I'm glad y'all are working through perceived difficulties. It'll work out, and so on. Even if y'all don't publish another comic page for another two months, I consider it money well invested.
> Sir, please don't insult me.

First, I'm glad that Sugar has the wherewithal to recognize that he feels insulted, and also to address it in a healthy manner. Second, I notice he called Noah 'sir'. I haven't noticed that before, but that's significant in that it tells us that Sugar considers Noah his superior. Until just now I wasn't sure whether there was going to be a power struggle while Noah's in the MK, but at least at the moment knowing that Sugar seems to respect Noah is a good sign (and maybe a good Sign). I think the fact that Noah is able to clearly speak to Sugar in his own language is a great help to that respect, though now that I think about it, I also find it interesting that so far Sugar is the only tower we've seen that hasn't railed against Erfworlder language use as being extremely limited. That may be significant as well.

I find it contradictory that Noah says Sugar, "[C]an't understand strength of this kind" but then goes on to explain it perfectly in words Sugar both knows and respects (covert/clandestine/camouflage). So Sugar is not (yet) arguing against the validity of the constituent concepts and terms.

So I have yet to see what Noah is going to try to explain to Sugar that Sugar doesn't understand. The next updates will be interesting I guess.

Off to read the rest of this thread...
InvaderTim wrote:
I just wanted to take a moment specifically to say that I really like the art here. (Obviously an appropriate thing to do, given that this is a comic page.)


Good point. In fact, until I saw this comment I hadn't even given a thought to the artwork or the fact that it was an all-comic update, so that's a good sign. The only thing I really notice that seems off to me - and I only notice this after going back for another look - are the amount of Noah's physical details. As a few examples: wrinkles around his eye, the jagged edge of his beard on his cheek, the striations in his hair. Until now we wouldn't have seen those levels of detail. They either wouldn't have existed, or been a straight line, or just an area of shade. Maybe this is what's making me feel the art is too realistic and losing the cartoony element. The colors and shading do look good though.

Jade wrote:
Granted, we haven't seen the improved models show facial emotion yet (other than a rather neutral face on Noah)


That might actually be helping it. Previous artwork wasn't always the best at conveying emotion either, specifically because the art was cartoonish.

DukeofTuring wrote:
Hey now, at least this isn't a comment on page 6 starting with "I haven't bothered to read the forum yet, but here's something I noticed..."


In case that was meant for me, the reason I do that is to post my unfiltered reaction to the update first before reading the comments. Personally, I find value in seeing peoples' initial reaction, and then following reactions as they notice additional details. Your mileage may vary.

greycat wrote:
The value of capturing Nestlý wouldn't just be in raw shmuckers. It has strategic value as well (a hidden island base where fliers could land, and ships could dock, without anyone knowing you're there -- for a while, at least). That value is much harder to quantify.


It would only have that value if you were able to maintain the alliances Nestle has with the wildlife surrounding the island. Without those allies the island is as reachable as any other, and as such would no longer maintain its secrecy.
Fla_Panther wrote:
DukeofTuring wrote:
Hey now, at least this isn't a comment on page 6 starting with "I haven't bothered to read the forum yet, but here's something I noticed..."


In case that was meant for me, the reason I do that is to post my unfiltered reaction to the update first before reading the comments. Personally, I find value in seeing peoples' initial reaction, and then following reactions as they notice additional details. Your mileage may vary.
Wasn't aimed at anyone in particular, and I do see the value in a reaction to the update uncontaminated by all the forum talk. What bugs me (and I suspect Malady) is someone presenting a more concrete point like a theory or an in-universe reference as if it hadn't just been brought up by someone(s) else. I suppose I'll bear in mind on here that some people are actually going out of their way to give their two cents before having their thoughts shaped by all the other commentary so far. Reading these forums as conversations can be a mistake when they're also time desynced reaction threads to a 3rd party's story.

Fla_Panther wrote:
greycat wrote:
The value of capturing Nestlý wouldn't just be in raw shmuckers. It has strategic value as well (a hidden island base where fliers could land, and ships could dock, without anyone knowing you're there -- for a while, at least). That value is much harder to quantify.


It would only have that value if you were able to maintain the alliances Nestle has with the wildlife surrounding the island. Without those allies the island is as reachable as any other, and as such would no longer maintain its secrecy.
Now I'm thinking of Nestley like one of those pacific island airbases in WWII, isolated little patches of land that might be worth a lot of blood and treasure to own. Trying to attack an island base that doesn't allow a direct amphibious attack but instead requires inland movement through difficult terrain sounds like it would be a particular pain.

The only air vs sea action in Erfworld I can think of, though, is an odd series of kidnappings by an air unit that left the targeted ships mostly unharmed but doomed without the kidnapped unit aboard. Would Erfworld's air units, generally speaking, be effective and economical if used to attack ships? I could speculate plenty but I think that's really just an unknown right now.

Erfworld fliers also aren't required to end their turns over land, which makes me wonder how useful a land base (city or otherwise) would even be to them. Nestley's made itself quite safe from the sea but I don't think we've seen Noah or Paige describe any anti-air defenses. Maybe there's some range limit on fliers that requires them to touch down at least every couple of turns? That might make an island air base useful. RE Nestley's defenses the tower might be all spelled up with shockamancy to zap any flyers, but we've seen Jillian and Caesar IIRC both consider landing flyers and attacking from the ground as a way around particularly tough AA defenses.
Fla_Panther wrote:
> Sir, please don't insult me.

First, I'm glad that Sugar has the wherewithal to recognize that he feels insulted, and also to address it in a healthy manner. Second, I notice he called Noah 'sir'. I haven't noticed that before, but that's significant in that it tells us that Sugar considers Noah his superior.

Not necessarily. The use of the word "sir" in English dialog can be taken in many different ways. One of those is that of the enlisted soldier addressing an officer, as you implied here. "Yes, sir. Right away, sir."

Another usage is an employee of a retail store addressing a customer. "I'm sorry, sir, we're out of that."

Another usage is a police officer addressing a citizen. In this case most especially, there is no implication that the citizen has any power over the police officer. "Sir, step out of the vehicle, or I will pull you out!"

----

There's also a form that's used in debate, or antagonistic dialog. "Sir, you wound me." "I assure you, good sir, I mean no disrespect." (Usually that's a lie.)

From Sugar's tone here, I'm fairly sure he's moving into one of the forms where "Sir" shows forced formality, rather than true respect, or subservience.
It seems to me that using "sir" (or "mam") in a customer service context is meant to imply subservience. It's limited and only during the commercial interaction taking place, certainly, but the corporate ideal would have most non-management employees treating the "always right" customer as a superior second only to their actual bosses. Nobody I know working in customer service would like to describe themselves as a "servant to customers" but that's not entirely off the mark.

And using formal, respectful terms in conversation can be a facade to one degree or another. But I'd view what Sugar says through a military context and "sir" there would indicate a superior-inferior relationship. In a rigid system hierarchy and commands are what they are, even if only grudgingly accepted. True respect for superiors is a good thing but it's not necessary either.
This one looks really good. Good job!