Book 5 - Prologue 28

With a lower-case capital god

Book 5 - Prologue 28
Comic - Book 5 - Page 28

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If you're going to ask a question, don't go onto a long rant (and especially don't end it with that quote, we all know what it means). I'm starting to think you don't want to hear the benefits of global warming after all.
Anomynous 167 wrote:
If you're going to ask a question, don't go onto a long rant (and especially don't end it with that quote, we all know what it means). I'm starting to think you don't want to hear the benefits of global warming after all.


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Yeah, it's almost as if a question was asked because I knew there wasn't going to be an actual answer, because the argument itself was made in bad faith (◡‿◡✿).

Edit: I hope this doesn't come off as mean/rude Anomynous; I know you like to joke a lot, so I'm trying to match your facetious and irreverent manner :P But I'll admit to having trouble walking the fine line between that type of humour and the verbal/literary equivalent of shanking someone :-\ So I guess if you feel a sharp pain between your metaphorical ribs, do please let me know.
Noah says "three-sided box"... We get a picture of a Rubik's Cube?

Cubes have 6 sides. What are the other sides??

And what does does it mean to rotate its... sides? ... To Turn a side...

A Rubik's Cube is 6 sides holding 9 mini-cubes each.

So, not 99 cubes...
Malady wrote:
Noah says "three-sided box"... We get a picture of a Rubik's Cube?

Cubes have 6 sides. What are the other sides??

And what does does it mean to rotate its... sides? ... To Turn a side...

A Rubik's Cube is 6 sides holding 9 mini-cubes each.

So, not 99 cubes...

Reminds me of how King James translated 70x7 as 77.
Malady wrote:

A Rubik's Cube is 6 sides holding 9 mini-cubes each.

So, not 99 cubes...

Well, it's actually 26 visible cubes, and an implied hidden cube in the center. It's easier if you just consider it to be three layers of cubes stacked on top of each other. Each layer is 9 cubes, so 27 total. The central one isn't visible, but the other 26 are.
greycat wrote:
Next, I don't really have enough technical expertise to estimate how difficult/costly it would be for Charlie to build an atomic bomb from scratch, versus just continuing to build assault rifles and giving them to his fast, invisible, flying Archons. At a guess, it doesn't seem to be cost-effective. If he wants to decapitate a few sides, he's already got enough military power for that.


But not for an instantaneous decapitation strike. Say Parson's in the field and, without any warning, no shots being fired, no chance to for a brilliant ass-pull, he's suddenly a barbarian with no purse and no scroll of GTFO. No side will take him for fear of their own inescapable destruction and going to the MK would currently be suicide. Parson has to join Charlescomm, spend all his time foraging rather than strategizing, try to live on reluctant or nonexistent handouts, or croak. Is there a downside for Charlie? Parson woke the volcano first. Charlie's just fighting fire with fire.
Toast wrote:
greycat wrote:
Next, I don't really have enough technical expertise to estimate how difficult/costly it would be for Charlie to build an atomic bomb from scratch, versus just continuing to build assault rifles and giving them to his fast, invisible, flying Archons. At a guess, it doesn't seem to be cost-effective. If he wants to decapitate a few sides, he's already got enough military power for that.


But not for an instantaneous decapitation strike. Say Parson's in the field and, without any warning, no shots being fired, no chance to for a brilliant ass-pull, he's suddenly a barbarian with no purse and no scroll of GTFO. No side will take him for fear of their own inescapable destruction and going to the MK would currently be suicide. Parson has to join Charlescomm, spend all his time foraging rather than strategizing, try to live on reluctant or nonexistent handouts, or croak. Is there a downside for Charlie? Parson woke the volcano first. Charlie's just fighting fire with fire.

Charlie does not want Parson to become a barbarian. That's why he's gone out of his way to keep Stanley alive.
That bit in the middle charactarizing Sugar's rhetorical positions seems very interesting. Possibly even insightful.

I don't know if I've said this, but I will now if it's again or not.

It's makes sense that the temples are the oposite of their rulers. That's hwy Sugar is warlike because Page is settled. Stanly's hyper, so Jed's mellow. Charlie's cynical and complicated, so Shirly's trusting and naive. Ceasar was indicisive and so his tower was very decisive. It's fascinating.
greycat wrote:
Quote:
Parson is an unspeakable evil because he can speak unspeakable words.

The words are (partially) unspeakable, not the unit. Noah can speak them, too. I suspect Paige can also manage a few, if the situation demands it. Hellabad, her unpublished work may contain lots of them, depending on how deeply hidden are the secrets she's trying to expose.

The label of "evil" is also not appropriate here. One speaks (ironically) of "unspeakable horrors", but a horror is not an evil. Evil is a choice.

There's "painwords" and then there's unspeakable stuff like "boop"

One doesn't speak of unspeakable horrors. Unspeakable horrors are scary.
Anyways we gotta remember that Parson wanted to be whisked away and that he likes fighting for the bad guys. So evil is a choice Parson would make.
I don't normally comment on updates, but the... depth of wordplay and exploration of how words are used to shape thought is fantastic in this update.

I love Erfworld for two primary reasons: the worldbuilding, and the deep, referential, thoughtful wordplay. This update particularly delivers on both, but especially the second of these. Great stuff.