Book 3 - Page 50

Book 3 - Page 50
Comic - Book 3 - Page 50
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khamul wrote:
I think Ansom has always been motivated by pride.

The reason was never the reason - it was the excuse. All he really wanted was to be the big darn hero at the front of the army, with everyone worshipping him.

The reason he feels hollow is because he is. And always has been. And now he's seen that, now he's recognised that there are things bigger than him, maybe he'll be able to grow. Maybe he'll find something worth fighting for.


That's not accurate. Ansom really is as earnest as Jack says he is. He's a pure guy like that. His motivations aren't slantwise or self-serving. Yes, he has pride, but ironically, quite a bit less than some vulgar patriots or anybody lower-class with an inferiority complex. It's more like he takes his identity seriously and wholeheartedly loves his roots.
Wii wrote:
0beron wrote:
Wii wrote:
I think that may be a Jack-specific trait. Not all Foolamancers are Jack Snipe.

I might actually argue the inverse. I think this might be an Eyemancer trait rather than just Foolamacers.


I was considering that angle as I was biking down the road, actually. Foolamancy is part of Eyemancy, and remembering things you see might be something Eyemancers just do. I'd argue eidetic memory isn't all too common, but then I realise that a Foolamancer who can't remember what things look like would have a tough time casting believable Foolamancy. If King Slately's Foolamancy baffle suddenly looks like a lean adonis, you'd have a very poor Foolamancer on your hands. (Or a very flattering one)

So it makes sense that Eyemancy, or at least Foolamancy, does indeed include (visual) memory being very good. I therefore acknowledge I may have spoken too hastily. (I still want it to be Jack-specific, I admit; favourite caster.)


You might as well say that it's the difference between a tennis player with a club foot versus one with working feet.

That's just a vague umbrella of stuff called talent.
Sizemore doesn't have it. Wanda does.
Or rather, they have different talents. Sizemore actually loves philosophy and learning outside his specialty. Wanda loathes it, but is otherwise quite a quick study.

These small things do matter. Wanda has paid harshly for her impatience and disinterest in other magics. Namely, the suggestion spell snapping back on her and over-relying on it to manipulate Jillian. (Something Maggie would probably consider a crude and ungraceful use of her discipline.)

Jack is just fucking brilliant even by their standards because his magic isn't just a hobby. It's something he just does. Like breathing. He can't not stir the pot or poke at the world around him. He's constitutionally incapable of it. It's the way Richard Feynman used to behave. And it's a lot like how ravens behave, which is how they come by their reputation as tricksters. Generally speaking, most people don't have that inclination or mindset.
To torture the tennis metaphor, there are different paths to being "smart."

Sizemore is the club-footed tennis player. He really loves playing tennis, he's just not very good at it. His passion makes up for his other flaws as a tennis player though.

Wanda hates tennis. She has great reflexes and kinesthetic vision. So she'd be good at it if she actually cared for it. As it is, she begrudgingly plays it because not knowing how to play is a weakness that Fate will punish.

Maggie plays tennis professionally. She's prim, orderly and studious. She gets up at the asscrack of dawn to jog, practices every day and is punctual. She has interesting insider insights about tennis. She's a professional and acts like it. She hopes one day to work her way up to being a well-paid and well-recognized athlete.

Jack is some goddamn weird savant. He's can mathematically calculate trajectories in his head in seconds. Or he tastes spatial relationships as colors or some weird shit like that. He appears distractable and unfocused and lives entirely uninhibited within his internal world, often to the social discomfit of others.
DVL wrote:
To torture the tennis metaphor, there are different paths to being "smart."

Sizemore is the club-footed tennis player. He really loves playing tennis, he's just not very good at it. His passion makes up for his other flaws as a tennis player though.

Wanda hates tennis. She has great reflexes and kinesthetic vision. So she'd be good at it if she actually cared for it. As it is, she begrudgingly plays it because not knowing how to play is a weakness that Fate will punish.

Maggie plays tennis professionally. She's prim, orderly and studious. She gets up at the asscrack of dawn to jog, practices every day and is punctual. She has interesting insider insights about tennis. She's a professional and acts like it. She hopes one day to work her way up to being a well-paid and well-recognized athlete.

Jack is some goddamn weird savant. He's can mathematically calculate trajectories in his head in seconds. Or he tastes spatial relationships as colors or some weird shit like that. He appears distractable and unfocused and lives entirely uninhibited within his internal world, often to the social discomfit of others.


Ace always wanted to play racquetball, but Slately only let him play tennis.
Parson is capable of understanding the technique and skill of tennis, but is incapable of actually performing it. Because he's out of shape.
This was an amazing update. Ansom was always a character that came off as being flat. But this update made me interested in him as a character.

Ironically it was himself realizing that he is empty that gives him depth.
Here's how I see Ansom:

He follows his beliefs wholeheartedly. He holds nothing back. He is entirely devoted.

But.. he also follows them like a fad. He picks up and follows his passions and beliefs without understanding why, like an adolescent child going through phases of first being gothy and then country and then jock.

And now, for the first time, he sees that he used to love something passionately (the idea of "royalty") which he no longer does. And he thinks that this past him was his "real" self, and he wonders what that means. Is he no longer really himself?

Or.. was that past-him really him? Maybe he just was devoted to the idea of Royalty because that was the beliefs that his family had raised him with, and he deeply loved his family.
That's where he should go with it, at least. He needs to understand why he follows his beliefs, and why he should, rather than just picking them up and following them blindly. Until then, he's going to keep drifting.

He never had a firm basis or foundation for why he followed his beliefs. He needs to find one.
Pointyleaf wrote:
Here's how I see Ansom:

He follows his beliefs wholeheartedly. He holds nothing back. He is entirely devoted.

But.. he also follows them like a fad. He picks up and follows his passions and beliefs without understanding why, like an adolescent child going through phases of first being gothy and then country and then jock.

And now, for the first time, he sees that he used to love something passionately (the idea of "royalty") which he no longer does. And he thinks that this past him was his "real" self, and he wonders what that means. Is he no longer really himself?

Or.. was that past-him really him? Maybe he just was devoted to the idea of Royalty because that was the beliefs that his family had raised him with, and he deeply loved his family.
That's where he should go with it, at least. He needs to understand why he follows his beliefs, and why he should, rather than just picking them up and following them blindly. Until then, he's going to keep drifting.

He never had a firm basis or foundation for why he followed his beliefs. He needs to find one.

I think it's more that until recently Duty was, for Ansom at least, a sufficient reason for Living and fulfilling the Titanic Mandate: Serve your Side faithfully until you croak, Bam, City of Heroes, here you come. Now he is starting to question that. The fact that Ossomer turned back to Jetstone when Ansom has had no such compulsion rise within himself, either for Jetstone OR Faq is what troubles him deeply. Ansom doesn't wonder whether his past self was him or not - he wonders if he has ever been truly alive, even before Decryption. And if Duty is not in and of itself sufficient for Living, what then of the Titanic Mandate? What do the Titans want Ansom to do with this second chance at Life that goes above and beyond doing his Duty to his Side??
No one in particular wrote:
0beron wrote:
...Maggie might be able to perfectly recall what Stanley was feeling during a Thinkagram.

Well, not perfectly recall... as was said in page 42:
Quote:
Parson stroked his chin. "How much of that is your own judgment, versus the extra stuff you can sense through the Thinkagram?"
"I couldn't rightly tell you," she said, tilting her head. "When casting, my own thoughts remain in the background, and are not perfectly distinguishable from the sensations of the spell."

I don't think that really has anything to do with her ability to recall it later. She's saying that because she's channeling someone else, she isn't certain whether what she "feels" is really her, or the subject. So what she's talking about is really unrelated.
. . . or something that the spell itself provides her.