Book 3 - Page 168

When my dreamboat comes home

Book 3 - Page 168
Comic - Book 3 - Page 168
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Except, Archons aren't a Charlescomm exclusive unit. At least I thought that was the implication.
Fla_Panther wrote:

Vendanna wrote:
What's that thing? lol parson isn't Seldon? from "Big bang theory". You tell me about Leyden jar and most people on earth will tell you "wut?"


Parson may not remember what it's called but I'm pretty sure he understands the general principle of a battery.


There's a bit of a difference between a Leyden Jar, which is pretty much a capacitor, and an electrochemical battery.
Fla_Panther wrote:

abb3w wrote:
my impression is that typical US K-8 science classes do not cover "how to build a Leyden jar"... perhaps in part because it's pretty easy to make one at home that can carry enough capacitive charge to booping kill you. They try not to introduce "how to kill yourself" experiments until at least sophmore year of high school, and even then only in honors classes.


Unnecessary requirement. I can't tell you how many general explanations I've seen of batteries (from ancient times through industrial revolution) simply by watching educational programs on PBS or Discovery or Smithsonian Channel, etc.

But there's a significance between general explanations and creating a demonstrable working model. And to top it off, this is something that could kill a person in the real world, b eing experimentally used to try to stave off something that could kill you in the erfworld, by someone who admits to forgetting most of his Trig. Parson may be willing to take risks, but Duty might compel him not to try rigging up some half remembered water battery that might result in him dying.
AFormerLurker wrote:
Except, Archons aren't a Charlescomm exclusive unit. At least I thought that was the implication.

True, but with a (limited) amount of CC livery, the observer would know that the statue depicts an archon, and not just a random naked chick.

Besides, to paraphrase Sgt. Colon, the line between art and smut is determined by whether the lady in question is accompanied by either a vase (or urn), or cherubs. Since cherubs are little baby angels, and archons are practically angels, I figure she's providing her own angel motif, and thus is appropriate for use as public art in a respectable city.

Of course it's also barely possible that statues in fountains show unit stats...
OneHugeTuck wrote:
If there's a buffer of completed comics, why no new comic yet?

According to Site Admin Tool Me Twice (see the Announcements subforum), a power outage that occurred more than 24 hours ago is implicated.

Sorry, posting from a tablet, so no link.
http://forums.erfworld.com/viewtopic.php?f=26&t=13163
Here's a link, posted from a tablet.
walpurgisborn wrote:

But there's a significance between general explanations and creating a demonstrable working model. And to top it off, this is something that could kill a person in the real world, b eing experimentally used to try to stave off something that could kill you in the erfworld, by someone who admits to forgetting most of his Trig. Parson may be willing to take risks, but Duty might compel him not to try rigging up some half remembered water battery that might result in him dying.

All of this aside, hooking up a large capacitor to a lightning rod does nothing to protect a flying object from lightning in the real world. What protects you from lightning is having a conducting pathway that provides current with an alternate way to go at a much lower resistance.
In other works, your probably okay if you are in full coverage metal armor. In fact, just a suit of chain-mail should by all rights make you immune to lightning attacks.
Fla_Panther wrote:
abb3w wrote:
my impression is that typical US K-8 science classes do not cover "how to build a Leyden jar"... perhaps in part because it's pretty easy to make one at home that can carry enough capacitive charge to booping kill you. They try not to introduce "how to kill yourself" experiments until at least sophmore year of high school, and even then only in honors classes.

Unnecessary requirement. I can't tell you how many general explanations I've seen of batteries (from ancient times through industrial revolution) simply by watching educational programs on PBS or Discovery or Smithsonian Channel, etc.

Ah; now, a non-specific sort of battery, particularly a potato battery, would seem far more likely than a Leyden jar (which is technically a capacitor, rather than a battery).
However... also with far less lethal applications, until ErfPhysics gets some major R&D.

Nohow, it's harder than most people would think to turn generic explanation into working implementation. A lot of folk have heard about blacksmithing, and maybe watched some stuff on the History channel, but there's probably fewer than 1000 people on our planet who you could drop naked into a large patch of virgin wilderness (of the sort that no longer exist...) who could come out with a functional broadsword before getting dead of old age.

Fla_Panther wrote:
DaveOTN wrote:
I don't recall offhand if he finished college, but when he's telling Janis about his romantic history he mentions hooking up with a couple girls in college.

I remember reading that he attended but I don't remember reading anything about him having graduated.

College dropout might also help to explain the Kinkos diversion.
I'll note, it's not exclusive with a major in European Military History.

illrede wrote:
Count_to_10 wrote:
abb3w wrote:

We know he's college educated, but I don't recall seeing any mention of what his specific major was. It's almost certainly not engineering, as most engineering curricula require enough subsequent math to make it hard to ever forget the basics of Trig, and it was pretty unlikely for a degreed engineer to end up at Kinkos, even at the heart of the Great Recession. Most of the other STEM fields, similarly; not to mention a competent physicist or chemist would seem likely have been trying to do a lot more rigorous experiments to try and figure out how Erfworld's magic has modified the laws of physics. This lack would seem to drop the chances.

I second that.

I don't know about that. Trying to feel out Natural Dirtamancy from first principles looks prohibitively time-consuming. Re-inventing himself as a manager of native casters is a practical approach.

Depends how much you're a "people" person, versus how much of the History of Science you remember -- with particular emphasis on the critical experiments -- and have the mathematical ability to apply. He's done some work with ballistics, trying to shoot arrows across hex boundaries; however, he doesn't seem to have considered the GR implications of that behavior.

Count_to_10 wrote:
Nobody said it would be practical. I can't speak for abb3w, but I meant something more along the lines of being compelled to by force of habit.

There's a joke circulating among some local STEM faculty that the difference between an engineer and a physicist is that if you draw a pentacle and summon a fire elemental, the physicist will sit there gibbering for the next week while the engineer hooks it up to a boiler-turbine system yelling "DO THAT AGAIN!"

That said -- more efficient understanding of the underpinnings of the universe facilitates identifying the choices that most effectively shift the environment to your preference. Pure research doesn't intrinsically have to have applications, but damn it's tended to pay off.

I'd vote for both habit and expectation of utility.
abb3w wrote:
Nohow, it's harder than most people would think to turn generic explanation into working implementation. A lot of folk have heard about blacksmithing, and maybe watched some stuff on the History channel, but there's probably fewer than 1000 people on our planet who you could drop naked into a large patch of virgin wilderness (of the sort that no longer exist...) who could come out with a functional broadsword before getting dead of old age.


Whaaat? Isn't it really so simple that you just have to collect few stone and wood blocks by hitting stuff with your fists and then combine them?
abb3w wrote:

That said -- more efficient understanding of the underpinnings of the universe facilitates identifying the choices that most effectively shift the environment to your preference. Pure research doesn't intrinsically have to have applications, but damn it's tended to pay off.

I'd vote for both habit and expectation of utility.


I agree and am aware that we proved that to ourselves beyond a shadow of a doubt back during the late 19th-early 20th centuries, the problem that I see is case-specific resource management- Parson has exactly one relevant mind available to begin with and he has immediate duties and concerns. Using himself to the best of his abilities may not be... the best use of himself. (He may not have time to do as Charlies has done; he's Minister/Warlord to a side that needs a lot of hands-on management or they get themselves into things like The Battle of Spacerock).
Spruce wrote:
Whaaat? Isn't it really so simple that you just have to collect few stone and wood blocks by hitting stuff with your fists and then combine them?


Naah, you can hit wood with your fists, no problem, but hitting stone with your fist will void it. First you combine the wood to make a bench, ...