Book 3 - Page 146

It ain't easy, bein'...

Book 3 - Page 146
Comic - Book 3 - Page 146
 
Recent posts... (See full thread)
M.A.D wrote:
I thought he was more like Cesare Borgia. But then again, I haven't looked much into history, and what I knew about his lore doesn't match well with Ceasar's.

Conflicts in fifteenth-century Italy were opéra bouffe. Wars were fought by mercenary condottieri who were always for sale to the highest bidder, even during a battle. Wars were for the most part a series of maneuvers with one side withdrawing when it found itself in an unfavorable situation. When battles did occur, they were cynical affairs which tended to be fought to a cautious stalemate or would end with one side resigning when the other gained a clear advantage. While Italy was living in its own little fantasy world, elsewhere in Europe, the first modern, professional armies where being created.

I really cannot fathom why some people hold Cesare Borgia in high regard. There weren't many commanders of the fifteenth century who'd be counted among the all time greats. While Henry V of England, the Ottoman Sultans Murad II and Mohammed II, John Hunyadi of Hungary, and John Ziska of Bohemia were all capable, they're all on the lower end of the spectrum, and Cesare isn't even in their league. He might be considered competent, but his greatest military accomplishments were achieved either with French troops and Swiss mercenaries provided by Louis XII of France or through treachery. French, and later Spanish, troops mauled virtually all local opposition they encountered, and Italy became little more than a battleground for foreign powers for next three centuries. Cesare only gained power through the patronage of others: his father, Pope Alexander VI, his brother-in-law, King John III of Navarre, and the aforementioned King Louis XII of France. He was better liked by his subjects than those he replaced, so he was probably an able administrator and ruler, and he was the archetype of the Machiavellian Prince, but, ultimately, he was a little man, ingratiating himself on greater men than him, trying to carve out a petty domain for himself when the great powers of Europe began descending on Italy.

Do you know how Cesare died? He was besieging a castle. A group of enemy knight fled. Cesare pursued them but got separated from his men. The fleeing knights ambushed and killed him. Getting separated from the troops you are commanding does not strike me as the mark of a great commander.

Cesare strikes me as the opposite of Erfworld's Caesar. Cesare was a subtle, scheming, and treacherous politician, but he wasn't the greatest military man. He may have been one of the greatest of the condottieri, but that isn't saying much. If anyone in Transylvito resembles Cesare, I would say it's Don King. If Transylvito ends up getting carved up as Don gets reduced to a pawn, pursuing his own petty agenda, in the conflict between Parson and Charlie, the comparison will be even more apt.

kaylasdad99 wrote:
And that's ANOHER thing I hate about Shakespeare!
Is all the twits who bloviate about Shakespeare
And how they prattle on about all his GREAT ACCOMPLISHMENTS
well la-di-da-di-dah!
And once they start to gushin' there's no stopping them
and then it's
"bluh-bluh-bluh-bluh-bluh SHAKESPEARE!"
Then he walks in, it's
"tunh-ta-dunh-ta-dah! SHAKESPEARE!"
He's holding court, and they're all
"Will, you're such a genius, and your writing is divine.
'A rose by any other name' is SUCH a clever line!"
And they're all "OOH!"
And he's all "Stop,"
And they're all "AHH!"
And I'm all "BLEARGH!"
AND I'M REALLY GETTIN' SICK OF IT!


Nick Bottom
(Something Rotten)

I guess it's hard to be the Bard...

Nick was just jealous that he couldn't deal with the transition from a synthetic language to an analytic one.

While I haven't had the pleasure of seeing Something Rotten, I just checked, and it is opening in my city on my fortieth birthday next year. I wonder if I should give myself a present and go see it. Also, damn, when did I become so old?
Nightseraph wrote:


I can't help but think erfworld torture would be remarkably effective on Parson. He's a total wuss compared to most units. A few puny holes in his legs left him screaming in agony. Here's a piker with third degree burns still in shape to stand at attention.
http://archives.erfworld.com/Book%202/203

Add in the fantasy tropes of what magical healing can mean for a torturer, if Transylvito cares to go that route, they can break Parson. I think he'd look good in a black pinstriped suit.


Nightseraph is either an incarnation of Norman D. Cota or is from Erfworld making comments like that.
Mrtyuh wrote:
M.A.D wrote:
I thought he was more like Cesare Borgia. But then again, I haven't looked much into history, and what I knew about his lore doesn't match well with Ceasar's.

Conflicts in fifteenth-century Italy were opéra bouffe. Wars were fought by mercenary condottieri who were always for sale to the highest bidder, even during a battle. Wars were for the most part a series of maneuvers with one side withdrawing when it found itself in an unfavorable situation. When battles did occur, they were cynical affairs which tended to be fought to a cautious stalemate or would end with one side resigning when the other gained a clear advantage. While Italy was living in its own little fantasy world, elsewhere in Europe, the first modern, professional armies where being created.

I really cannot fathom why some people hold Cesare Borgia in high regard. There weren't many commanders of the fifteenth century who'd be counted among the all time greats. While Henry V of England, the Ottoman Sultans Murad II and Mohammed II, John Hunyadi of Hungary, and John Ziska of Bohemia were all capable, they're all on the lower end of the spectrum, and Cesare isn't even in their league. He might be considered competent, but his greatest military accomplishments were achieved either with French troops and Swiss mercenaries provided by Louis XII of France or through treachery. French, and later Spanish, troops mauled virtually all local opposition they encountered, and Italy became little more than a battleground for foreign powers for next three centuries. Cesare only gained power through the patronage of others: his father, Pope Alexander VI, his brother-in-law, King John III of Navarre, and the aforementioned King Louis XII of France. He was better liked by his subjects than those he replaced, so he was probably an able administrator and ruler, and he was the archetype of the Machiavellian Prince, but, ultimately, he was a little man, ingratiating himself on greater men than him, trying to carve out a petty domain for himself when the great powers of Europe began descending on Italy.

Do you know how Cesare died? He was besieging a castle. A group of enemy knight fled. Cesare pursued them but got separated from his men. The fleeing knights ambushed and killed him. Getting separated from the troops you are commanding does not strike me as the mark of a great commander.

Cesare strikes me as the opposite of Erfworld's Caesar. Cesare was a subtle, scheming, and treacherous politician, but he wasn't the greatest military man. He may have been one of the greatest of the condottieri, but that isn't saying much. If anyone in Transylvito resembles Cesare, I would say it's Don King. If Transylvito ends up getting carved up as Don gets reduced to a pawn, pursuing his own petty agenda, in the conflict between Parson and Charlie, the comparison will be even more apt.

kaylasdad99 wrote:
And that's ANOHER thing I hate about Shakespeare!
Is all the twits who bloviate about Shakespeare
And how they prattle on about all his GREAT ACCOMPLISHMENTS
well la-di-da-di-dah!
And once they start to gushin' there's no stopping them
and then it's
"bluh-bluh-bluh-bluh-bluh SHAKESPEARE!"
Then he walks in, it's
"tunh-ta-dunh-ta-dah! SHAKESPEARE!"
He's holding court, and they're all
"Will, you're such a genius, and your writing is divine.
'A rose by any other name' is SUCH a clever line!"
And they're all "OOH!"
And he's all "Stop,"
And they're all "AHH!"
And I'm all "BLEARGH!"
AND I'M REALLY GETTIN' SICK OF IT!


Nick Bottom
(Something Rotten)

I guess it's hard to be the Bard...

Nick was just jealous that he couldn't deal with the transition from a synthetic language to an analytic one.

While I haven't had the pleasure of seeing Something Rotten, I just checked, and it is opening in my city on my fortieth birthday next year. I wonder if I should give myself a present and go see it. Also, damn, when did I become so old?


Just from familiarity with the cast album, I guarantee you would not regret the experience.
dagrmaan wrote:
Nightseraph wrote:


I can't help but think erfworld torture would be remarkably effective on Parson. He's a total wuss compared to most units. A few puny holes in his legs left him screaming in agony. Here's a piker with third degree burns still in shape to stand at attention.
http://archives.erfworld.com/Book%202/203

Add in the fantasy tropes of what magical healing can mean for a torturer, if Transylvito cares to go that route, they can break Parson. I think he'd look good in a black pinstriped suit.


Nightseraph is either an incarnation of Norman D. Cota or is from Erfworld making comments like that.


The safe way for the torturer to operate, then, would be to start about an hour before dawn, and as turns progress, work her way back toward sunset.
CarniDollMancer wrote:
Mad Humanist wrote:
CarniDollMancer wrote:

All I was getting at was that it is necessary to understand that what we know as Shakespeare is actually not Shakespeare. It is a garbled collection put together from multiple recollections of every actor in the play in question. Because at the time, plays were written in a way that each actor only saw his own lines, not the whole, and they had to piece them together after the Bard's death, doing their best to remember the exact order (oh, and completely inventing stage directions).

When I see a claim like this I have to check it out. http://www.bl.uk/collection-items/shakespeares-first-folio This is from the British Library so it should be as reliable as scholarship can offer. It offers some correction of what you say.

That link is not in disagreement with what I said. It clarifies, but is more or less just what I said. Two guys compiled the works, from many sources. I didn't say two, but that link is still more or less my point.

Dude, no. You described verbal sources. The link described authorized written sources.

You said "a garbled collection put together from multiple recollections of every actor in the play in question," which describes memorial reconstruction. Compare that with foul papers, fair copies, and prompt books, complete manuscripts written or authorized by the playwright.

CarniDollmancer wrote:
Because at the time, plays were written in a way that each actor only saw his own lines, not the whole,

Cite?
This one time, I saw a Shakespeare play performed, and it was really funny and I really enjoyed it.

...That is all.
elecampane wrote:
So, basically Parson was right in previous update, thinking that they may be afraid to go near him.

Someone already mentioned that Don's signamancy looks worse here, like he's getting sicker/older. I agree.

I wonder if when Maggie and Jack upped the security on eyebooks in Book 2, they thought to establish protection from unauthorized users.

Does Benjamin's right hand looks awkward to you? I mean, Don's chair looks to be rather far away from the gun on the table, yet Ben simultaniously stands behind the chair and holds a hand near a gun
Image


The prespective may be a little screwed up, but at the same time all I noticed is that he's wearing a "100" gold chain and that makes me happy.
FormicaArchonis wrote:
Three different people wrote:
Friday can't come soon enough!

If Friday we get another Juggle Elves scene I am going to laugh paroxysmally.

Well, we did... kinda...
thecommander wrote:
Romeo and Julie has a very similar plot to A Midsummer's Night Dream. The difference is the former is a tragedy and the latter is a drama. I betting this is going to be a comedy.

Again - kinda.
Romeo & Juliet has a very similar plot to Act 5 of A Midsummer Night's Dream - with the former being a tragedy and the latter a comedy :-)
decius wrote:
Pardon, being a huge nerd, understands gas turbines well enough to describe a new mechanical flying mount. However, the riders of this mount have to specialize exclusively in its use in order to avoid hitting the ground or hex borders. Thus, they can dance fight.

Because when you're a Jet, you're a Jet all the way.


But he'd probably need old Ben to work with him. Bennie and the Jets.

Thecommander236 wrote:
Rome II is a better example for making deals. Trade deals were completely broken in Medieval II if you could get them with every side, then you would just rake in the money and become more powerful then they could possibility imagine. *cackles madly at old memories*


You mean ... like Charlie, and his deals with everyone?

EDIT (this thread is good)

CarniDollMancer wrote:
Shakespeare ...you had to fit the mood of the night to have a good show.

Kinda like ... http://www.girlgeniusonline.com/comic.php?date=20051019 that?
Yeah, kinda like Charlie has done.