Book 3 - Page 117

"You get it? I won!"

Book 3 - Page 117
Comic - Book 3 - Page 117
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Mut wrote:
I guess we'll find out what this is about in a few days, and I may just be doing a bunch of wishful thinking, but for now put me in the "head-fake" camp.


Oh so wrong.

I am curious about why the parley was not shown, though...
Mut wrote:
Mut wrote:
I guess we'll find out what this is about in a few days, and I may just be doing a bunch of wishful thinking, but for now put me in the "head-fake" camp.


Oh so wrong.

I am curious about why the parley was not shown, though...


Because we'll find out what they were, and how it was done (e.g., Vanna link), at a later stage of the story. For now, there's FUD around what exactly has happened to Parson, what drove him to this end result etc. This creates narrative tension.
I didn't even figure this out until the next page.. Needed to be a LITTLE clearer than that!
wih wrote:
Mut wrote:
I am curious about why the parley was not shown, though...


Because we'll find out what they were, and how it was done (e.g., Vanna link), at a later stage of the story. For now, there's FUD around what exactly has happened to Parson, what drove him to this end result etc. This creates narrative tension.


Yes, understood, but the same applies to every high-stakes event in the story and this is the first time I can think of when the narrative has cut away from Parson to obscure something the reader knows must have happened. (Contrast this with the contract itself, for example, when we got to read the legalese in full.) I'd like to think there was a reason behind the choice. But my non-question was rhetorical -- we'll find out when Rob unveils what happened.
Whispri wrote:
Lipkin wrote:
When GK stayed with the Hippies, they didn't pay with shmuckers. They paid with labor. Since the decrypted don't really have anyone to guard in the Magic Kingdom anymore, nothing is stopping them from just working for room and board with the hippies.

They paid with magical labour primarily. They can't keep multiple casters tied down in the magick kingdom just to pay for one of Parson's follies. And it's not like all the diplomatic damage Parson's has caused is going to go away just because he's defected.

Well they are decrypted, so they don't even need upkeep.
They just need a place to stay, and there's no reason Janis would deny them that.
Can someone explain for me why telling Lilith to surrender would violate the contract? Isn't that a decision Lilith makes herself? Or in other words, if surrendering is a violation of the contract, that's a pretty easily exploitable loophole, isn't it? Just send expendables to voluntarily surrender and Parson could've negated everything GK owed.


ManaCaster wrote:
Xellos wrote:

Remember, Parson isn't really the Perfect Warlord. That's why the summoning spell had to give him artifacts to fix its goofup. He can't read stats, he doesn't have infinite computational power, and he occasionally lets sentiments get in the way of his planning, and he got rid of one of the crutches meant to fix that.


Parson is the perfect warlord....to get GK out of its specific situation (hence it found someone who happened to be gaming precisely that situation). Being perfectly suited to Erfworld is not a requirement of the spell, and not a mistake of the spell either. It ignores suitability in favor of efficiency, which makes sense. Quicker to teach exactly the right person how the world works, than deal with a not-exactly-right person who already knows. Same situation with Judy, who was exactly suited to the situation Charlie summoned her for, but completely unsuited for what happened afterward.
zbeeblebrox wrote:

ManaCaster wrote:

Remember, Parson isn't really the Perfect Warlord. That's why the summoning spell had to give him artifacts to fix its goofup. He can't read stats, he doesn't have infinite computational power, and he occasionally lets sentiments get in the way of his planning, and he got rid of one of the crutches meant to fix that.

Parson is the perfect warlord....to get GK out of its specific situation (hence it found someone who happened to be gaming precisely that situation). Being perfectly suited to Erfworld is not a requirement of the spell, and not a mistake of the spell either. It ignores suitability in favor of efficiency, which makes sense. Quicker to teach exactly the right person how the world works, than deal with a not-exactly-right person who already knows.

No goof? Nothing missing? Even for that specific situation? Then what's this page all about?: https://wiki.erfworld.com/TBFGK_106
Quote:
Can someone explain for me why telling Lilith to surrender would violate the contract?

Well asking a unit to surrender is basically capturing it - at least both Lilith and AAA seemed to think so.
It's also why Jack phrased his request so carefully and why it's exceedingly unlikely that the Mary in the final panel is actually one of Jack's illusions.
zbeeblebrox wrote:
Can someone explain for me why telling Lilith to surrender would violate the contract? Isn't that a decision Lilith makes herself? Or in other words, if surrendering is a violation of the contract, that's a pretty easily exploitable loophole, isn't it? Just send expendables to voluntarily surrender and Parson could've negated everything GK owed.


Because she says "OK!" and is now captured, which causes GK material harm. Asking Lilith to surrender is essentially initiating a capture attempt. If Parson had sent "expendables" to surrender, Charlie would have just ignored them--he is not obliged to accept a surrender/initiate a capture just because they offer themselves up.
It's not the act of making Lilith surrender wich would have caused a breach it is the attempt. Like hellabad Lilith would accept Blondie's terms of surrender.