Book 3 - Page 102

“Arright, thank you for calling in.”

Book 3 - Page 102
Comic - Book 3 - Page 102
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Actually THAT is a theory that makes sense AND fits Balder's storytelling style.
We still don't know if it's true, but I'm inclined to belive it over that other theory.
Oberon wrote:

it's also not often I encounter someone who knows the inspiration for my forum name...

Captain of our fairy band,
Helena is here at hand;
And the youth, mistook by me,
Pleading for a lover's fee.
Shall we their fond pageant see?
Lord, what fools these mortals be!
Mirage GSM wrote:
Oberon wrote:

it's also not often I encounter someone who knows the inspiration for my forum name...

Captain of our fairy band,
Helena is here at hand;
And the youth, mistook by me,
Pleading for a lover's fee.
Shall we their fond pageant see?
Lord, what fools these mortals be!


Huh. Midsummer's Night is practically required at some point in my curriculum at least..
Sir Dr D wrote:
spriteless wrote:
Someone else, somewhere in the Everything Else Erfworld forum Arkentools thread, had a pretty neat theory. The Arkentools are like computer cheat codes used to debug erfworld. The shoes give infinite move, which is useful for getting across all the terrain. The Dish hax a lot of fundamental data types. The pliers let you test out any army without needing upkeep, and the hammer is a cool fun weapon that the devs like to use.

This theory could be updated since we know pliers can repatriate prisoners.


Ha ha! I like that theory. It is probably not true, but it is a fun one. It really makes me want to use the hammer. Can some one make an army with the pliers so I can smash it? :mrgreen:


Hmm.. King Banhammer didn't have the Arkenhammer, but it would fit.

I'd like to see Parson build his own Game Genie. The caster could send out random low res letters up in the sky.
A E P O Z X L U
G K I S T V Y N
Dark Shadow wrote:
Huh. Midsummer's Night is practically required at some point in my curriculum at least..

Not practically for me. I studied design and tech for theatre. I've read half the Folio. With intense over-analysis of plot structure and theme included.

Weirdest Midsummer I have seen (and that is saying something) was while I was in school. The set was a raked disc painted to be the moon, and every so often, the intense scenes would be underscored by The Beatles and the action became almost a silent film of ridiculous melodrama before the lines started again. I think these were supposed to be representations of what was in the characters' minds, but it still amounted to a Beatles Midsummer Melodrama on the Moon.
CarniDollMancer wrote:
[Weirdest Midsummer I have seen (and that is saying something) was while I was in school. The set was a raked disc painted to be the moon, and every so often, the intense scenes would be underscored by The Beatles and the action became almost a silent film of ridiculous melodrama before the lines started again. I think these were supposed to be representations of what was in the characters' minds, but it still amounted to a Beatles Midsummer Melodrama on the Moon.


...What.
spriteless wrote:
Someone else, somewhere in the Everything Else Erfworld forum Arkentools thread, had a pretty neat theory. The Arkentools are like computer cheat codes used to debug erfworld. The shoes give infinite move, which is useful for getting across all the terrain. The Dish hax a lot of fundamental data types. The pliers let you test out any army without needing upkeep, and the hammer is a cool fun weapon that the devs like to use.

I independently raised this theory in the "Just what is decryption?" thread. Indeed, it sounds plausible to me.
CarniDollMancer wrote:
The set was a raked disc painted to be the moon.
Well as I understand it, in Shakespearean times, the stage was indeed literally tilted (hence the origin of "upstage" and "downstage") so as to provide a better view to the audience.
0beron wrote:
CarniDollMancer wrote:
The set was a raked disc painted to be the moon.
Well as I understand it, in Shakespearean times, the stage was indeed literally tilted (hence the origin of "upstage" and "downstage") so as to provide a better view to the audience.


Yeah it was. Which made it a pain to have any furniture, because they had to have all there legs be made specially...
I was in Romeo and Juliet my freshman year of high school and we built a tilted set. The stagehands would spritz it down with Sprite to help people not slip while sword fighting. Yet at the end of my fight, I was choreographed to be knocked onto my back. So every night I'd fall, start sliding on my back downstage, and then I'd be sticky for the rest of the show.
I also was once in Romeo and Juliet.
Would have liked to play Oberon but only got Egeus ^^°
We had a pretty normal stage, but we had several dance acts interspersed in the play. (Most of the cast first met in a dancing school.)
Oberon and Titania danced a waltz :)