Book 2 - Page 7

Book 2 - Page 7
Comic - Book 2  Page 7
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HandofShadows wrote:
Um you folks ARE familiar with "Double your plesaure, double you fun" being a advertising slogan for Doublemint Gum, right?


Wrigley would understand it immediately.
Even if a decrypted caster loses its ability to actually cast im fairly certain a unit with that knowledge and background (since they retain all thier memmories) would be an incredibly useful advisor / teacher. Im fairly certain parson/sizemore would love to have the unit recalled if statwise it was not worth more then common infantry.
JustDoug wrote:
HandofShadows wrote:
Um you folks ARE familiar with "Double your plesaure, double you fun" being a advertising slogan for Doublemint Gum, right?


Wrigley would understand it immediately.


I think you have named the Dittomancer. That now seems so perfect. "Wrigley"
nerf-dweller wrote:
JustDoug wrote:
HandofShadows wrote:
Um you folks ARE familiar with "Double your plesaure, double you fun" being a advertising slogan for Doublemint Gum, right?


Wrigley would understand it immediately.


I think you have named the Dittomancer. That now seems so perfect. "Wrigley"


Unfortunately, the name was given to a Unaroyal infantryman who died at Warchalking during the Summer Updates. This particular update was such a hit that the name now has a "sacredness" about it.

I'm going to throw out (for fun) the name Caleb Major (see if anyone gets that reference).
*snickers* Catch-22.

Very nice.
Rosa Vernal wrote:
*snickers* Catch-22.

Very nice.


Well done, indeed.

For those who might be curious, a prominent character in Catch-22 was named Major M. Major (with the M being short for Major of course). However, he did not know this until he signed up for the armed forces, as his father told his mother that he had named the son Caleb. After joining the army, he's soon promoted by a computer with a sense of humor to the rank of (you guessed it) Major. Hence, his full name and title was Major Major Major Major. Perfect for a dittomancer.
Um, i thought Catch-22 was set in WWII. How could someone be promoted by a computer?
Dr Pepper wrote:
Um, i thought Catch-22 was set in WWII. How could someone be promoted by a computer?


You're more puzzled by a a computer during WWII than one with a sense of humor? It is literature, afterall.

To answer your question, computers not only existed during the 1940's, but were vital for managing logistics and tasks like cryptology. Admittedly, they ran on punch cards and were as large as a bedroom, but computers none the less.
Lord Kasavin wrote:
Dr Pepper wrote:
Um, i thought Catch-22 was set in WWII. How could someone be promoted by a computer?


You're more puzzled by a a computer during WWII than one with a sense of humor? It is literature, afterall.

To answer your question, computers not only existed during the 1940's, but were vital for managing logistics and tasks like cryptology. Admittedly, they ran on punch cards and were as large as a bedroom, but computers none the less.


I am quite aware of that. I also know about Boole, Babbage, Lovelace, the Jacquard Looms, and the 1910 census.

It is because i know about those things that i ask how could someone be promoted by a computer in WWII. Do you have an answer?
Dr Pepper wrote:
Lord Kasavin wrote:
Dr Pepper wrote:
Um, i thought Catch-22 was set in WWII. How could someone be promoted by a computer?


You're more puzzled by a a computer during WWII than one with a sense of humor? It is literature, afterall.

To answer your question, computers not only existed during the 1940's, but were vital for managing logistics and tasks like cryptology. Admittedly, they ran on punch cards and were as large as a bedroom, but computers none the less.


I am quite aware of that. I also know about Boole, Babbage, Lovelace, the Jacquard Looms, and the 1910 census.

It is because i know about those things that i ask how could someone be promoted by a computer in WWII. Do you have an answer?


Catch-22.