Book 2 - Page 70

Book 2 - Page 70
Comic - Book 2 – Page 70
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Indeed it does hurt. Wanda is so smart that she is a master of her own magical discipline and is able to operate in many others. Very smart people often rely their brains too much and forget that skills and training are essential for some things, like strategy. I work with lots of brilliant people and their mistakes are sometimes epic!
Goshen wrote:
Indeed it does hurt. Wanda is so smart that she is a master of her own magical discipline and is able to operate in many others. Very smart people often rely their brains too much and forget that skills and training are essential for some things, like strategy. I work with lots of brilliant people and their mistakes are sometimes epic!


The other thing about Jack and Wanda is that they've been trained to ignore anything silly and/or stupid seeming in Parson's plans. They've seen him do stupid things and be right so many times before that they assume he must have a reason for it. So one more stupid thing doesn't seem like a big deal to them. They just forgot that THEY did it this time instead of Parson. When A reminded them, that's when the lightbulb went on for Jack and the foolhammer came down to make it hurt. As, indeed, it should.
Umm, when have they actually seen anything that, once explained, still seemed silly or stupid in one of his plans?
drachefly wrote:
Umm, when have they actually seen anything that, once explained, still seemed silly or stupid in one of his plans?


I'd have suggested "flying" Banana or running into the hex wall, but Jack and Wanda weren't present for those.

Maybe the fictional battle simulations for Jack? Not that he didn't enjoy it...
Who's to say Parson won't someday face 2,000 Archons in battle? :D
drachefly wrote:
Umm, when have they actually seen anything that, once explained, still seemed silly or stupid in one of his plans?


I think that was the point that was being made - once explained it all made sense, but at the time it may have seemed silly. The argument being, that they have come to expect silly to make sense eventually. It is hypothesised that now, when faced with something nonsensical, they just accept it on the basis that it will make sense later.

My guess for why they didn't notice it before is simply that Jack has a different type of intelligence, the reason he was able to judge previous plots, plans and stratagems to be good (e.g. flash-and-snatch of Ossomer) was because he had seen them created and play-tested and had had each explained in detail. IHe was using memory not intelligence, and there is a world of difference between those two things.
sleepymancer wrote:
My guess for why they didn't notice [the dichotomy between waiting for Parson whilst actively trying to bring down the Jetstone tower] before is simply that Jack has a different type of intelligence, the reason he was able to judge previous plots, plans and stratagems to be good (e.g. flash-and-snatch of Ossomer) was because he had seen them created and play-tested and had had each explained in detail. IHe was using memory not intelligence, and there is a world of difference between those two things.
To give Jack a bit more credit, he did use his new understanding of lateral thinking to stick his head into the MK and gain a lot of good intelligence as to exactly why Parson hadn't made it through into Jetstone yet. Sure, once the author made it clear that a side only has a single MK portal that changed a lot of things for the readers, but before he took careful pains to make that mechanic clear there was no real reason why the readers should assume that taking down the Jetstone tower was in any way a disadvantage for GK.
sleepymancer wrote:
drachefly wrote:
Umm, when have they actually seen anything that, once explained, still seemed silly or stupid in one of his plans?


I think that was the point that was being made - once explained it all made sense, but at the time it may have seemed silly. The argument being, that they have come to expect silly to make sense eventually. It is hypothesised that now, when faced with something nonsensical, they just accept it on the basis that it will make sense later.


This. The key word in your quote drachefly is once explained. In situ, as it were, things may not make sense. And sometimes, Parson doesn't have time to explain all his plans. But it is assumed that Parson ALWAYS has a plan, because so far Parson always HAS had a plan. So anything stupid and/or silly must be part of a plan that just doesn't make sense YET. Key word there is yet. Because he is so much smarter than them (as they now take as a point of faith) by now they might just assume it's okay. Especially Jack and Wanda. Jack, since he helped Parson figure out the rules of the world, and Wanda because she thinks Parson is something like Fate incarnate.
Oberon wrote:
sleepymancer wrote:
My guess for why they didn't notice [the dichotomy between waiting for Parson whilst actively trying to bring down the Jetstone tower] before is simply that Jack has a different type of intelligence, the reason he was able to judge previous plots, plans and stratagems to be good (e.g. flash-and-snatch of Ossomer) was because he had seen them created and play-tested and had had each explained in detail. IHe was using memory not intelligence, and there is a world of difference between those two things.


To give Jack a bit more credit, he did use his new understanding of lateral thinking to stick his head into the MK and gain a lot of good intelligence as to exactly why Parson hadn't made it through into Jetstone yet. Sure, once the author made it clear that a side only has a single MK portal that changed a lot of things for the readers, but before he took careful pains to make that mechanic clear there was no real reason why the readers should assume that taking down the Jetstone tower was in any way a disadvantage for GK.


Oh, I give Jack loads of credit for intelligence and lateral thinking, just not for strategy!! I think Jack was always a lateral thinker, but being given a name for it allowed him to better understand the ways in which he thinks. I assume that the reasons the mechanic was not made clear earlier was so that we learn as Jack realises, its cuts down us pointing at a clever character and saying 'idiot' (which we may have done) until he is, and get to revel in his wit for the bits before. Plus, drama.

p.s. Oberon, that is a damn-good use of square brackets explaining what I meant but didn't say, thanks!
sleepymancer wrote:
Oh, I give Jack loads of credit for intelligence and lateral thinking, just not for strategy!! I think Jack was always a lateral thinker, but being given a name for it allowed him to better understand the ways in which he thinks. I assume that the reasons the mechanic was not made clear earlier was so that we learn as Jack realises, its cuts down us pointing at a clever character and saying 'idiot' (which we may have done) until he is, and get to revel in his wit for the bits before. Plus, drama.

p.s. Oberon, that is a damn-good use of square brackets explaining what I meant but didn't say, thanks!


Absolutely. The creativity necessary to generate convincing veils requires a deep understanding of the human mind and its processes. In other words, you must be able to think like your victim in order to fool your victim.

Anyone that has played a mentalist in Role-playing Games has to learn the same capacity, or play something else. Quite often, it takes a natural skill to achieve a believalbe result, especially when your victim already knows how capable you are, as was the case in fooling Jillian at the chokepoint.