Book 2 - Text Updates 039

Book 2 - Text Updates 039

The fall had been perfect. Glorious, oh.

Sylvia was long past "a lack of fear." As she plunged toward the shattered roof, the city swelling up to meet her and the dwagon's limp wings flapping behind like battle standards, she couldn't even manage concern. She faced her doom this time around like a gambler with a pat hand. Oblivion was bluffing. Showboating, even.

The wind rushed, then roared in her ears. Enemy arrows, which had been hissing by in arcs, slowed and froze in space as she matched their Erfward journey.

She spotted other riders falling away from their tumbling mounts. But though she was no longer technically mounted, she stayed tight in the saddle. Her lifeless red seemed almost to take the fall in a controlled dive. Such a good beast. It knew that losing one's life was no excuse from Duty.

The roof passed, the scene changed, and with shocking abruptness, they hit. The stone floor, solid as a rulebook, gave them nothing.

Even at that, the great red beast served well, taking the worst of it for her. She was thrown off only upon the first bounce, and she struck the stone in a flat tumble. With half a somersault, she was down and stopped. Her body had massive bruising and tearing, but she was not incapacitated.

At least, not until the dwagon's body crumpled over on to her. The Titans played such strange games with their dolls.

Incapacitation could take a number of forms. All of them meant that you could not move, could not initiate engagement or disengage, could not personally fight or cast. Some meant that you would croak (or be dusted) if an enemy so much as struck you a single blow. Others, that you would live only until the start of your next turn, unless healed. Sometimes you were conscious, and sometimes not.

Sylvia was conscious, and not terribly wounded. But she was pinned, much like she had been hit with pink dwagon goo or another incapacitation special.

And she was alone. Lying with her face at the ground, she lifted her head.

The only boots she could see moving belonged to the enemy.

---

Fud's fall had been not so bad. All the way down, Fud had looked at his struggling yellow dwagon and tried to think of something to help it. He kicked it with his newly powerful legs.

How that worked was this: it didn't.

He hit it with his newly powerful fists. How that worked was this: it also didn't.

But how it felt was: good!

Just at the end of the fall, Fud tried flapping his newly powerful arms. How that worked was this: not at all. How it felt was: embarrassing.

Fud and his dwagon landed in a shape that was: okay. But the dwagon had taken more than ten arrows. Enemy stack attacked them right away. The dwagon croaked a few before the enemy croaked it, and Fud put his sword through the rest. He leveled!

Fud had less than one order to follow. Fud looked around for more enemy to fight. But then Fud did hear one order.

---

The boots were running in all directions, mostly away. But it was only a matter of time before some random enemy unit would encounter and engage her. Wounded and with only one, weaponless arm free, she would fall to the lowliest stabber. She could not fight and she could not run.

So she did what was left and commanded.

"Gobwin Knob units! To me!" Sylvia shouted. She could see no friendlies. But some of the enemy soldiers certainly did turn and notice her, and a Jetstone warlord was among them. He was only Level 1, but that would do. From the chaos, he added a fourth and fifth random infantry unit to his stack of three, and charged her.

---

Fud followed the one order. He found Lady Sylvia Lazarus and stacked with her and got her leadership bonus. She couldn't move, so he had to croak everything himself. He croaked a warlord. He leveled again!

How it felt was this: fun.

---

Once the skirmish was finished and Sylvia knew she would survive (at least long enough to fight in the rest of this battle) it took her all of a minute to decide that wasn't good enough. The Atrium was slowly emptying of retreating enemy troops. She wanted to do something to hit them here, so that they would become her side's troops. But she could not move.

She looked at the Hobgobwin heavy. Her only bodyguard.

"Unstack," she ordered him. "Go out and find Captain Archer if you can, and bring him back here."

The Hobgobwin, which did not speak Language, nodded in complete understanding of her intent and hobgobbed off.

On the face of it, this was a stupid risk. Any ordinary warlord would never overplay her hand this way.

But she and "the end" were playing a tournament today, and she was leading. She would bet her life against that bluffing blowhard again and again, for even a little bit of gain. She would bet oblivion right off the table, even if she herself was bluffing.

And this might be a very nice gain she was playing for. She had called for the only archery-capable warlord in the battle group. Should the Hobgobwin return with him, his ranged attacks plus her leadership would allow them to drop as many targets as they had arrows. And then...well, they could gather more arrows.

This time, she could let herself lie perfectly still and do nothing. She had done all she could, and it was up to Fate. She relaxed. As far as the enemy was concerned, she was only a lifeless body. A role she was popped to play.

In her mind, she recited her battle poem. Once through, twice through...

She lost count. But when the Hobgobwin returned with another Hobgobwin, and a grinning and almost unscratched bow-wielding warlord, she had recited it more than ten times.

Comic - Book 2 - Text Updates 039

Recent posts... (See full thread)
A Sylvia post brings everyone running, yes, but this really is good stuff. We like the tragic, we know the status of her plot-armor is precarious, but the insouciant attitude works in a different way than even Wrigley's determination and dutifulness, poignant as I found his part).
Pointyleaf wrote:
Oberon wrote:
And then refer to the value of the "assets" currently in the Social Security Trust Fund. Here's an interesting fact: Those "assets" are valued at exactly nothing. What is your concept of a trust fund?


Hmm. I was just reading along, looking forward to posting my idea about stack bonuses (+1 for every doubling in number, until someone else posted the idea first), but I decided to comment on this. The SS Trust Fund is made up of US Treasuries. Are these worthless? (Signs point to 'no', given how many of them the Chinese have been buying, and at retail value, too.) Honestly, if US Treasuries become worthless, the dollar is also worthless.
The SS Trust Fund is not made up of US Treasuries, it is not made up of anything. It is a construct of promises. Promises against the good will of the US government, to be sure, but that is not anywhere at all the same as a trust fund in a bank that only you may draw against. Read the disclaimer at the bottom of each SS statement (not check, I'm not that old, but I get fairly regular SS statements) if you want to drink the cool fresh waters of reason. Paraphrased and very simplistically, it states that your projected SS benefit is subject to change at any time, and is not guaranteed in any way. Any law may be passed at any time which will reduce your benefits, increase your benefit age, or otherwise invalidate your anticipated benefit.

Me, I don't event work SS into my retirement plans. I don't expect it to be in place in anywhere the same form that it is in now, despite the fact that I'm paying into it with every paycheck. I'll try my best to be sure that I can take care of myself and my spouse, because I don't want to bank anything upon a promise which may be revoked at any time and for any reason. Do I spend less and save more due to this calculation? You bet. But I'm also atypical in that I don't ride a balance on any credit card, ever. Credit cards are unfortunately a necessary evil for building a good credit rating, and they are just about required for any adult in our society. Try to rent a car without a CC... But no one needs to be sucked into the trap of high interest rates for unnecessary purchases. Make them work for you. Up the man!
Oberon wrote:
The SS Trust Fund is not made up of US Treasuries, it is not made up of anything. It is a construct of promises.

What do you think a US Treasury IS? He doesn't mean the actual US Treasury building. He means T-notes and T-bills.

Oberon wrote:
Any law may be passed at any time which will reduce your benefits, increase your benefit age, or otherwise invalidate your anticipated benefit.


While this is true, the trust fund exists. It is not imaginary. It is held by the US government, which disburses funds from it according to the law. It is these disbursements which are subject to change, not the trust fund's existence.
Oberon wrote:
The SS Trust Fund is not made up of US Treasuries, it is not made up of anything. It is a construct of promises. Promises against the good will of the US government, to be sure, but that is not anywhere at all the same as a trust fund in a bank that only you may draw against.


If you're trying to draw a connection between the money you put in to SS and the money you take out, then yes, there's nothing there that's reserved for *you*, since SS spends the money you're putting in to pay out people who are currently drawing. There is (or at least was) a surplus going into SS, however, and that surplus was invested in Treasury Bills. (This is the SS Trust Fund, which is a subset of the money in Social Security. It's projected to run out in under 20 years, possibly much sooner.)

Seeing as how the primary reason banks are considered secure is that the FDIC (i.e. the Government) insures them, and that banks are allowed to lend out between 4x and 10x as much money as they actually possess (thus creating money from nothing), using a bank as an example of something that is more secure (or at least 'made up of something' more) than a treasury bill (which is what the SS Trust Fund purchased with its surplus) is false.

So, Oberon, what you may be arguing might be correct from your perspective (if you're arguing that Social Security is not a personal fund like a personal trust fund is), but the words you chose to argue your point create a statement that is incorrect.
DevilDan wrote:
A Sylvia post brings everyone running, yes, but this really is good stuff. We like the tragic, we know the status of her plot-armor is precarious, but the insouciant attitude works in a different way than even Wrigley's determination and dutifulness, poignant as I found his part).


My sentiments exactly. Apart from the Plot Armour part, for some reason I'm thinking there's a big fat bullseye over Sylvia. At least she didn't mention her lifelong ambition about having a Dwagon farm in Montana yet; nor expressed anything like being on the last day before retiring.
Social Security is in no real danger, unless someone is stupid enough to raise the age cap on retirement.
Raising the Age Cap forces people to work longer and cuts into the job pool for the next generation of workers.
This in turn prevents them from finding jobs and paying into Social Security.
Fixing Social Security is a simple matter of removing the 105,000 dollar cap on the Social Security tax.
Basicly there are a group of Americans who don't pay thier fair share of Social Security, but can still collect full benefits.
Its pretty simple math.

Its just like increasing Tax Rates actually helps improve everyone's earnings.
Lets say you pay 75% taxes on anything above 1 million a year.
This will actually have several effects.
1. Lower ticket prices for concerts, movies, sporting events etc.
2. Higher salaries and better benefits for other workers.
3. Increase in consumer buying power leading to increased profits for everyone which creates a cycle.

Also the quality of goods and services will improve, but that is a whole other story.
drachefly wrote:
While this is true, the trust fund exists.
That's a lot like saying that the money you set aside for gas is a "trust fund." Then you want a few beers, and suddenly it's just as spendable as all your other money. Sure, you promise to "pay yourself back" so that you can buy gas later, but that's money you haven't yet earned. The trust fund does not exist.
MarbitChow wrote:
There is (or at least was) a surplus going into SS, however, and that surplus was invested in Treasury Bills.
Close. The money was spent. And then IOUs were drafted promising to pay it back. Just like your decision to buy beer and pay yourself back so that your gas fund can actually buy you some gas.
Decorus wrote:
Its just like increasing Tax Rates actually helps improve everyone's earnings.
Lets say you pay 75% taxes on anything above 1 million a year.
This will actually have several effects.
1. Lower ticket prices for concerts, movies, sporting events etc.
2. Higher salaries and better benefits for other workers.
3. Increase in consumer buying power leading to increased profits for everyone which creates a cycle.

Also the quality of goods and services will improve, but that is a whole other story.


As a student in economics, I have to disagree. Raising taxes have never and will never "3. Increase in consumer buying power leading to increased profits for everyone which creates a cycle." nor improve "--- the quality of goods and services...". It will however, or rather it might, benefit you in other ways. Especially companies will benefit from higher taxes (ironically enough) as governments tend to spend a lot on infrastructure and other areas that involves private organisations.
But it will not (directly) result in increased bying power for the average consumer. I could propably write several pages on this subject, but i'll spare you for my crude english, atleast for now.

Yours truly
BLANDCorporatio wrote:
DevilDan wrote:
A Sylvia post brings everyone running, yes, but this really is good stuff. We like the tragic, we know the status of her plot-armor is precarious, but the insouciant attitude works in a different way than even Wrigley's determination and dutifulness, poignant as I found his part).


My sentiments exactly. Apart from the Plot Armour part, for some reason I'm thinking there's a big fat bullseye over Sylvia. At least she didn't mention her lifelong ambition about having a Dwagon farm in Montana yet; nor expressed anything like being on the last day before retiring.


Moving to Montana soon
Gonna be a dwagon farm tycoon
Dr Pepper wrote:
BLANDCorporatio wrote:
DevilDan wrote:
A Sylvia post brings everyone running, yes, but this really is good stuff. We like the tragic, we know the status of her plot-armor is precarious, but the insouciant attitude works in a different way than even Wrigley's determination and dutifulness, poignant as I found his part).


My sentiments exactly. Apart from the Plot Armour part, for some reason I'm thinking there's a big fat bullseye over Sylvia. At least she didn't mention her lifelong ambition about having a Dwagon farm in Montana yet; nor expressed anything like being on the last day before retiring.

Moving to Montana soon
Gonna be a dwagon farm tycoon
More along the lines of "I would liked to have seen *koff* *koff* Montana *die*", from THfRO. Not that Zappa isn't awesome all by his lonesome.