Book 2 - Text Updates 033

Book 2 - Text Updates 033

King Slately followed his son out the stateroom door. At the corners of the alcove, piker guardsmen in white snapped to attention and stomped. A slinking servant girl tugged on a golden rope. A courtier bowed low, awaiting the King's will.

"To the tower top, for parley," Slately told that one, without breaking stride. "Battle to follow."

"Yes, sire." He scurried off.

Tramennis had already bounded halfway down the length of the carpeted hallway. Slately cleared his throat loudly. The Prince pulled up and waited, turning and bowing his head, but with a little smirk.

Slately nodded to him. There was time. A king need not trot. He strode forward, as stern and regal as his wretched little legs would carry him.

Signamancy was a terrible curse. The Titans knew his true nature. No unipegataur-riding warrior king was he, no towering leader and orator. Over the three-thousand or so turns he had ruled, he had only once seen battle, and that from a well-guarded turret. And so he had shrunk. Gone white and fat. A crown and ermine robes could do only so much to glorify his squat frame.

Nor would he complain of it, truly. Such was the Titanic will. In their infinite wisdom, let it be so.

But what of the Signamancy of his only remaining son? Slately considered him as he approached: slight, wispy, dandyish. And now, Chief Warlord. They were a pair, were they not? To be about to fight a battle?

Without another glance, he continued deliberately for the throne room. Tramennis fell in beside him, and together, the King and Prince proceeded.

Prince Tramennis was the sixteenth of Slately's twenty-three sons and daughters, popped at a time when they were flush with princes and princesses but generally short of warlords. Therefore, he had not allotted the extra turns to pop this one as an heir. One look at his scrawny frame, and Slately had sent him off to a far-flung campaign to the northeast, not much caring about the outcome.

Tramennis had neither conquered nor fallen on that mission, but had cornered the enemy and opted to negotiate. He returned with a new alliance, including quite a nice little tribute from the former enemy side.

Thereafter, there was little thought of sending him out to fight. He traveled with courtiers as ambassador-at-large, an unusual role for a Royal unit, but how it had paid off! If one did the Mathamancy, Slately supposed that Tramennis may have earned his upkeep more than any of his siblings. Hm.

At the throne room, they did not pause, but they gathered up a large entourage of courtiers and nobles. The Royals spake not, while the rest of the lot formed an excited, babbling wake. The King and Prince walked reverently beneath the gaze of the hall's statues: many heroes, a few disappointments, all Royals of Jetstone. And all with better Signamancy than the two of them. Slately regarded them.

There stood Victor, his first son, fond of music and beloved of the court. And Lustrius, his third. That one ought to have been a king. Titas, laconic and grim. Forthewin, who could command and conquer, but whose legendary Luckamancy eventually wore out. Wonderloaf, who fell bravely in his first battle, sliced down while still fresh. And on, and on.

In each case, Slately had done as a king ought to do: let them lead. It was not for a King to manage the armies in the field. Tradition held that the Chief Warlord made the hard decisions, and the King saw only to the management of Shmuckers and other assets, such as deployment of artifacts and casters.

He was doing that again now. But he had never felt so uneasy about it. This new light on Charlie, this strange warning about the warlord who beat Ansom, who destroys mountains...

Slately glanced at Tramennis, the diplomat. Of course he wished to negotiate. It was in everyone's nature to play to one's strengths. But in this case, was it so well advised?

Tramennis caught his glance, and met his father's eyes with a questioning look. Slately cleared his throat.

"I have every confidence in you, my son," he said, with great gravity. "I'm certain you will make the kingdom proud again."

The Prince said nothing, but his face slowly split in a broad grin. He looked as if a great weight had been lifted from his shoulder. There might even have been a tear forming in the corner of his eye, as he squared his shoulders and looked at the grand archway ahead of them. He looked ready to face anything now.

Such was the worth of the king's currency, and Slately spent his lies well.

Comic - Book 2  Text Updates 033

Recent posts... (See full thread)
well this is nice. a very convenient way to get around the whole is ossamar still an heir (which im sure he is not) and a storyline way to kill slatley regardless if tram lives. because we don't know how many of his children are still alive and how many were created as heirs good odds at least theirs a few surviving children attending other affairs and one is most likely still an heir very clever rob i like it.
asweethero wrote:
well this is nice. a very convenient way to get around the whole is ossamar still an heir (which im sure he is not) and a storyline way to kill slatley regardless if tram lives. because we don't know how many of his children are still alive and how many were created as heirs good odds at least theirs a few surviving children attending other affairs and one is most likely still an heir very clever rob i like it.


Actually, before Ansom gathered RCCI and marched on GK, we know Jetstone had 4 princess. That was mentioned in a text update, when Sylvia talked to Ossomer about Arkenpliers. We don't know who the fourth brother is, though. We only know 3 so far.
jkosta wrote:

The best way to tell a lie is to surround it with truth. If you cry wolf and there's actually a wolf 9 times out of 10, people will come on the tenth time anyways.


I just re-read the text update, and I dunno, he sounds genuinely fond of some of them ("Lustrius, his third. That one ought to have been a king. Titas, laconic and grim."). (and, heh, somehow I thought there were over 30 princes when it was 23).

So I guess I was too suspicious the first time round
build6 wrote:

I just re-read the text update, and I dunno, he sounds genuinely fond of some of them ("Lustrius, his third. That one ought to have been a king. Titas, laconic and grim."). (and, heh, somehow I thought there were over 30 princes when it was 23).

So I guess I was too suspicious the first time round


Agreed, specially because:
-Erfworld is still primarly focused on war and raw resources, not politics and intrigue. Altough treason it's possible I don't believe you need to always be watching your back in fear one of your own units will backstab you if you even blink. You need to be doing something really wrong for your units to turn against you, or else some other faction is pulling their strings (and even then it's an hard thing to do, as we've seen Jillian break out from mind control from Wanda with just a little archon help).
-High level warlords and heirs aren't exactly five smuckers the dozen, so you can't just sacrifice them for nothing. Don mentioned he had inherited several advisors/courtiers from his father, and since he didn't like them he simply sent them to dangerous but possibly profitable missions and didn't bother to replace them as they died. This way he still profited something from their deaths and still got rid of them.
I equate Erfworld to Medieval Total War. Easier for me.

If I have a lot of generals, I have to make certain the generals are loyal, because a general that rebels often takes an army with it or, worse, a city. Should I strip a General of his titles and give them to another, then he loses loyalty. thus, I keep the heir the same person, unless he'd be terrible.

If this were Medieval, there would be non-combat units like diplomats, priests, merchants, yadda yadda that would be important, but useless in a fight.

I liked this update. Good look into Singamancy. Definitely thinks Parson is a sighnamancer. I don't think him name things will change them, but it will give us a hint into who they are.
So kings can have a ton of other "children" that aren't all warlords, awesome.
What evidence do we have that Parson is a luckamancer? I remember only the "all my luck to you" that Parson "casted" on Bogroll.
But those lucky 20's Bogroll did could be due to his evocation of Lord Hamstaaar and the Hamster symbol on his armor.
Or maybe just luck. :P
mindsword wrote:
If this were Medieval, there would be non-combat units like diplomats, priests, merchants, yadda yadda that would be important, but useless in a fight.

The "courtiers" Don King mentioned appear to be something like that (units that specialize in city-management type functions rather than combat).
the_tick_rules wrote:
So kings can have a ton of other "children" that aren't all warlords, awesome.

I would interpret it differently ... I think the children of Slately (=royals he ordered popped) were all Warlords, just some of them had not such high bonuses as other ones (I think Tramennis has a quite lower bonus than Ossomer, for example). And most of them are dead now (two uncroaked).
Sorry for the thread necromancy, but I reread this and realize I probably didn't note just how well-written and effective this update was.
http://www.erfworld.com/book-2-archive/ ... -10-27.png

Worth a second read, I'd say. :P