Inner Peace (Through Superior Firepower) - Episode 061

Inner Peace (Through Superior Firepower) - Episode 061

An awkward silence filled the emerald-tinted darkness of the Wizard‘s Hall.

Jillian stood to one side and watched the lot of them, keeping her lips clamped shut. She had never won any battles with her mouth, and she wouldn‘t win this one. But she trusted Jack Snipe. The Foolamancer looked at Marie for a moment, then finally stepped forward to address his King.

“It must be grand to be a Lookamancer,” said the Jack. He cocked his head at Orwell. “Brother Orwell truly sees. He can see enough to be certain of this course, and I envy him his vantage. It certainly speaks volumes of your, ah...wisdom, Your Wisdom. But forgive me, I lack such insight. I am comparatively blind and ignorant.”

“Then you should trust those who see better, and know better, Jack,” said Banhammer. Standing on the dais, the King was still smiling broadly. But his eyes had lost their twinkle. Jillian could hear a note of warning in his tone.

“Oh, but I do, Your Wisdom!” said the Jack eagerly, turning to Marie. “Sister Marie, for example. Her insight guides us all. Indeed, without her vision, Faq would already have perished!”

“It‘s about to,” said Jillian, despite her plan to keep her mouth shut. They ignored her anyway.

“I do see some interesting things,” said Marie hesitantly. “But in truth, Yah Wisdom, things have gone cloudy. Something verray important is about to happen. This is a turning of all turns. But I con‘t say what.”

“Well, of course it‘s very important!” boomed the King grandly. “Faq‘s Court is being reborn, at the heart of an empire!”

“It‘s a new dawn for Erfworld,” said Dame Branch, stepping closer to the Banhammer. “You must be seeing that.” Orwell nodded enthusiastically to Marie. Jillian‘s stomach clenched and went sour.

“Thot could be the case,” admitted Marie, casting an uncertain glance at Jillian. “But I find it difficult to see how it fits with other Predictions.”

“What I was thinking,” said Jack, “was that we really ought to turn before the Ruler of Haffaton, whoever he might be.”

“It is the Overlady Judy Gale,” said Banhammer, crossing his arms. “And that would only cause a needless delay. She is not here. We would have to travel to her.”

“Is that so?” said Marie, narrowing her eyes at Dame Branch.

The Florist touched the King‘s arm tenderly. “Loj, if you‘ll recall, what I actually said was that the Overlady was indisposed and unavailable. I told you how she is,” she whispered quietly, though all of them could hear.

She turned to address the group. “Judy‘s desires are simple,” said Dame Branch. “She wants to be alone. She‘ll have nothing to do with the new Court, believe me. She‘s no such visionary as Loj Banhammer of Faq. But she won‘t stand in the way of our enlightenment, either.”

“If she is in the city, then we ought to tunn before her,” said Marie. “If only for ceremonial propriety.”

“Agreed,” said Jack Snipe, folding his arms to match the King‘s. Jillian was sure that the body gesture meant something in the subtle language of the Court of Faq, maybe that he was making a hard stand. “We ought to meet our new mistress. The one that, ah, you know...that we‘ll be pledging to obey.”

Banhammer‘s brows furrowed. He turned his head to Dame Branch. “I was certain you indicated she was not in the city.”

“Then I misspoke,” said the Florist. “She‘s here, but she‘s truly not fit to see you. Or to be seen.”

“But might we at least visit her, to pay our respects?” asked the King. “It does seem minimally proper.”

“I don‘t think so,” said Dame Branch. “She wouldn‘t like being roused at this hour.”

“Well. We can certainly wait the few minutes until dawn. For the start of your turn,” said Banhammer. At the mention of the start of turn, Jillian noticed the Florist shot a quick glance at her magical instrument, resting in its stand beside her. Oh, if she could grab that thing away, maybe they could get something going when the spell expired. Meanwhile, Banhammer had pulled his arm away from her. Jillian studied his face. Suspicious, maybe. Was he finally catching on to her? “Or the end of it. Or any time she might be better disposed to receiving us.”

Dame Branch shook her head and smiled sadly. “I don‘t think such a time would come, I‘m afraid. She‘s really not right in the mind, you see.”

“She‘s not that bad,” said Jillian. All the heads turned her way. “I‘ve talked with her plenty of times. She could see you.”

Her father took a step away from the Florist, and looked Jillian in the eye. He said nothing, but she had his full attention.

“I like her,” said Jillian. “She‘s a little batty, but she‘s nice. She‘s one of the few people from Haffaton I don‘t wanna croak. But I think that‘s what I was brought here to do. That‘s what she wants.” She pointed at the Florist. “She put me here to croak Judy. ‘Cause she‘s the heir.”

Dame Branch rolled her eyes. “I brought you here to be safe and happy. And to turn, of course. You‘d be happiest serving Haffaton, especially with all of your friends and family and comrades here.”

“Minus the ones you slew,” said Jillian. “Minus Bart, and Hedda, and Chip, and the–”

“Lady Firebaugh‘s ways are not especially peaceful, no. I‘ve tried for hundreds and hundreds of turns to make her see the value of Life. Of peace. She's blind to it, but she is serving faithfully, just where she belongs. She‘s a Croakamancer. They are awful. They‘re creatures of destruction. But she‘s where she is Fated to be,” said the Florist, casting a glance at Sister Marie. Marie‘s chin was high. Her face said nothing.

“Yeah?” said Jillian angrily. “That's great. I‘m Fated to take Lady Firebaugh to ‘the next phase of her journey.‘ And I‘m Fated to croak the ruler of Haffaton!” Eyebrows went up all around. She was sure she‘d seen a flash of fear in Dame Branch‘s eyes. “And probably a whole lot more crap like that, too. And I don‘t wanna know about it, I don‘t wanna hear about it, and I don‘t wanna do anything about it. I don't care. I hate this stuff!”

Banhammer looked to Sister Marie, who nodded to him. Yes, this is Predicted.

“But maybe I‘m gonna have to, though,” Jillian continued, finding more and more clarity of mind as she yelled, as she let it all out. “Maybe the only way out of this for me is to march upstairs, hack Judy‘s head off, throw Wanda over the back of a gwiffon and just get the flip out of here.”

Her father couldn‘t help grimacing at the violence of the verbal image. Titans bless him, he should see her on a battlefield.

“Maybe I have to give you all my friends and my family and my comrades, to escape here at all,” she said directly to the Florist. “And I think that‘s what you want. I think you‘re counting on me to do that. Well, too bad. I‘m not gonna. I‘ll take it the hard way! Always!”

Her shout echoed through the hall, fading out to stunned silence. So much for keeping her mouth shut.

Dame Branch folded her hands in front of her. She seemed about to reply, but a feminine voice suddenly spoke over them all, coming down from all directions at once.

“My! Well,” said the voice of Judy, resounding through the hall. “I‘m flattered that you like me enough not to want to kill me, Jillian. Batty as I am. Haha! I like you, too, kid.”

The six of them looked around in confusion, but a hand grabbed hold of one of the hanging green curtains at the side of the hall, and pulled it aside. Behind it was a little booth, with metal tools or ornaments of some kind adorning it. Jillian didn‘t recognize anything in there.

Inside it stood the Overlady, with Wanda Firebaugh, the scarecrow, and the metal golem. She was carrying her broomstick staff and wearing the blue dress she favored...and something else. Shining red shoes upon her feet.

“Judy!” screamed Dame Branch, losing all composure and rushing off the dais toward the booth. “Why are you wearing them?” she hissed, through clenched teeth. “Why are... How did you get the Arkenshoes?!”

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Recent posts... (See full thread)
Kreistor wrote:
drachefly wrote:
That's not what 'right' means. Fer boop's sake, Kriestor. The idea of improved approximations such that newton was right is a way of being generous about the earlier theory, NOT a way of saying that later, better theories are wrong.

The 19th century physicists are right that Newton was right, by implicitly caveating them to being restricted to their available evidence, but there's no way you can twist it to say that they'd be right to say that QM is wrong. You CAN say that to them QM would be unjustified. And that's what we were trying to suggest you amend your statement to, and is very explicitly what you refused to do. You can even say that it would be procedurally correct for them to reject QM. That doesn't make QM wrong, or even obviously wrong.


But that wasn't your argument, drach. I interpreted your "we were wrong" to mean that the 19th century Scientists were wrong, and so I should assume I'm wrong, because I can't know more evidence won't come to light. If that was not your intent, could you please clarify, because I am having trouble resolving that statement and what you just wrote.

And, no, I said nothing about 19th century scientists being right to say QM is wrong. They can and should force stringent experimentation on a theory so utterly radical and foreign to their known Science, but they can't say it's wrong, when a phenomenon has been detected. They might postulate that the evidence was faked and repeat it themselves, and so initially assume it's wrong. That's normal and acceptable. See Cold Fusion, and continuing confusion about that particular branch of science. Scientists are allowed to approach a new phenomenon from both a positive and negative standpoint, and it's good that they do, because we can learn even more new things from a broader range of experiments.

I heard all of this in my Phil of Science class last semester. It seemed stupid to me then, it seems stupid to me now. 19th century scientists WERE wrong. And I expect that eventually today's physicists will be proven wrong too. That's the point of science. That's why the falsification principle works. Being right doesn't teach us anything.

Here's the trap that so many people seem to fall into. "Being Wrong" doesn't necessarily mean "It doesn't work". Newton's gravitational formula was ultimately proven to be inaccurate, but it was accurate enough to get us to the freaking Moon. Math, which is the basis of physics, is unforgiving. There's The Solution. Everything else is Wrong. Reality is a bit more forgiving. There's Right, and then there's Good Enough. Technically, Good Enough is still Wrong, according to the math, but it still serves to hold the buildings up well enough. That doesn't make Good Enough any less Wrong. It just means that the people doing the figuring at that point were close, but didn't nail it.

So far, everyone in physics has been wrong. The theories that hold today hold only because they haven't been proven wrong yet. I don't think that anyone is arrogant enough to think that we've nailed it. We're still ultimately wrong. We just haven't figured out how yet, that's all. We're right enough to make boop work, but that doesn't mean we are RIGHT.
Housellama wrote:

I heard all of this in my Phil of Science class last semester. It seemed stupid to me then, it seems stupid to me now. 19th century scientists WERE wrong.


Right and wrong aren't proper terms to discuss scientific theories. A theory is always right, since it is based on a series of postulates and follows from them in a rigorous way, it is a consistent theoretical construct. It may or it may not be consistent with observations, that's the only relevant aspect.
And yet another thread has become completely and totally un-fun to participate in. :(
Housellama wrote:
[read previous post for entire message]So far, everyone in physics has been wrong. The theories that hold today hold only because they haven't been proven wrong yet. I don't think that anyone is arrogant enough to think that we've nailed it. We're still ultimately wrong. We just haven't figured out how yet, that's all. We're right enough to make boop work, but that doesn't mean we are RIGHT.


By that standard, nothing in our world is ever right. Not science, religion, politics, economics, anything. It's not just Science that changes with time and discovery... everything does. Your standard makes "being right" impossible and unusable in any context. Including analysis of this comic. Rob does make new information known that changes what we knew to be true to now be false.

Would you like to take that all the way to its logical conclusion, or shall I?
To take it back a little ways:

Kreistor wrote:
Anyway, this Speculation about Tools having Primary associations to schools is clearly and obviously false without a lot more supportable statements in the comic.
Salem wrote:
I just find this statement off. I mean how can something be obviously false if it's possible that more evidence might support it. The two clauses are kind of a contradiction.
Kreistor wrote:
Two ways...
drachefly wrote:
The objection was logical-structure in nature, not asking for that hypothetical evidence. Take a look at the sentence beginning 'I mean' once again. Maybe twice again. Maybe add 'sufficiently that it becomes obviously true' at the end.


I'm kinda iffy on the tool-school theories. Little confidence.

I'm not THAT confident that they're false... and with what you said, offering the opening for supporting statements in the comic, you can be very confident that they're false - but not up to the level of 'clearly and obviously false'.
Kreistor wrote:
The power list [for the 'Hammer] came to the Tool from Wanda....Wanda is an expert in magic, so the list stands.

Except for two crucial caveats you are leaving out. 1) Wanda is only an "expert" (and even that term is debatable) in the schools she has practiced and 2) you left out the crucial phrase "thinks". As in:
Text 44 wrote:
Wanda said she thought it was a whole mess of different magicks.

So the list suggests that the 'Hammer doesn't have a primary association, but there is still plenty of room for Wanda to be wrong (or just flat out lying because she's like that). It's not proof.
In games I have played, there are "schools of magic", and there are artefacts, and while the artefacts may have powers similar to some schools they aren't really linked to any.

Example: a piece of armour may have resistance to (reduce by 50%) death and holy attacks and also block shots, defence +1.

I think we really don't have enough evidence yet for good guesses.
Kreistor wrote:
Oberon wrote:
Kreistor wrote:
Sorry, no. That was an old argument, but ended when the Tool listed the properties and their schools.
You forget that Stanley isn't especially bright or studious, and hasn't spent much time trying to figure out more powers of the 'hammer.

The power list came to the Tool from Wanda. They are not his own work product, and therefore not subject to his weaknesses. Wanda is an expert in magic, so the list stands.
That makes no sense at all. Stanley owned the 'hammer before he met Wanda.
Kreistor wrote:
Oberon wrote:
Kreistor wrote:
There is unsupported speculation that Charlie is a Thinkamancer, now that we know Casters can Rule.
Supported, even if not concrete. Charlie may have been an Efbaum caster unit.
Charlie and Charlescomm are cited as existing before Story 0, as competition on the merc market. Doesn't float. We do not have a starting point for Charlie's attunement or entry into the merc market, and so have no clue when he entered the Erfworld political scene.
That may be comfortable for you. Blue wizard tends to disprove you. We shall see.
Kreistor wrote:
Oberon wrote:
Kreistor wrote:
There is unsupported speculation that Charlie is a Thinkamancer, now that we know Casters can Rule.
Supported, even if not concrete. Charlie may have been an Efbaum caster unit.
Charlie and Charlescomm are cited as existing before Story 0, as competition on the merc market..
Nah, they're cited as competition before Jillian enters as a narrator in book 0. We don't know if CComm existed before the Goodminton segment.
Oberon wrote:
Kreistor wrote:
The power list came to the Tool from Wanda. They are not his own work product, and therefore not subject to his weaknesses. Wanda is an expert in magic, so the list stands.
That makes no sense at all. Stanley owned the 'hammer before he met Wanda.

Not sure where your confusion is Oh. Kriestor was referring to the fact that Stanely believes the 'Hammer uses several schools of magic BECAUSE Wanda told him so. When he got the hammer is irrelevant, before Wanda, he presumably just accepted that it worked and was cool without knowing or likely even caring *how* it worked.

Also random side-note, it's a little tiresome that you still have that siggy Oh, not really sure what's it's point was, other than to try and make it seem like you weren't being dense in the conversation that came from, cus taking things out of context is the only way you can make yourself look good.